Plato censorship

Exiling the Poets

You may find a model of the lesser in the greater, I said; for they are necessarily of the same type, and there is the same spirit in both of them. In order to demonstrate once and for all that justice really is valuable for its own sake alone, Plato must show that a life of the second sort is superior to a life of the first sort.

For further discussion see WilliamsSchauerEaston, If all sexually explicit material is obscene by whichever of these standards is chosen, then all sexually explicit material will be pornography on this definition.

Nonetheless, this principle-that government is justified in prohibiting speech that contributes significantly to a group's inequality- is one that some liberals may find equally disturbing.

There must be an answer that derives more fundamentally from the nature of reality. Pornography, on this view, is an important tool for exploring and expressing new or minority forms of female sexuality. If you are perfect you cannot change since any change would be for the worse. When Thrasymachus falls silent, other characters from the dialogue continue to pursue the central questions: Other sexually explicit representations depict acts of violent coercion: Likewise, we might think that consumption of pornography will be a cause of violent sexual crime or of sexist attitudes and behaviour more generally if there is good evidence to suggest that consumption of pornography increases the incidence of sexual violence or sexist behaviour, holding fixed other known causes of these harmful states of affairs.

In this passage, Mill sets out the principle that underpins the prevailing liberal view about when it is justified for the state to coercively interfere with the liberty of its citizens. In particular, they may disagree albeit sometimes implicitly about how three central elements of the harm principle should be understood: The harm caused by expression must be very certain and very great before it is legitimate for a state to prohibit it.

The supreme lie is a lie against God; the lying poet has no place in our concept of God. Is Justice Better than Injustice.

Plato on censoring artists — a summary

Of course Plato does make a couple sensible or at least defensible points about selection of literature for children. But if there is an absolute necessity for their mention, a chosen few might hear them in a mystery, and they should sacrifice not a common [Eleusinian] pig, but some huge and unprocurable victim; and then the number of the hearers will be very few indeed.

He even argues from this that God could not be the author of all things, but only of those things that are good. MacKinnon puts the point graphically: Proteus a minor sea-god in Greek mythology: Those, I said, which are narrated by Homer and Hesiodand the rest of the poets, who have ever been the great story-tellers of mankind.

May 05,  · Hence, in debates over censorship and other forms of state regulation that restrict the liberty of individuals against their will, the burden of proof is always firmly on those who argue for censorship to demonstrate that the speech or conduct in question causes significant harm to others.

In my Philosophy of Art course, we are discussing Plato’s philosophy of art, by means of selections from Statesman and Books 3 and 10 of The Republic, along with snippets from Ion, Phaedrus, and Symposium. In The Republic, Plato makes a systematic case for censoring all arts. The task of the Platonic philosopher is to take up the “ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry” [b] and to.

Plato on censoring artists — a summary

Plato’s first plan is to “create a censorship of the writers of fiction” (Plato 13). The job of these people will be to pick which stories are “good “and which stories are “bad”. The job of these people will be to pick which stories are “good “and which stories are “bad”.

Censorship is the subject of several dialogues in The Republic, the major work of Greek philosopher Plato. His stance is perhaps summarized in Book II of The Republic by the phrase that " literature may be either true or false ", i.e.

true stories and fictions, Plato objects to the fictions as false. Censorship is the subject of several dialogues in The Republic, the major work of Greek philosopher Plato. His stance is perhaps summarized in Book II of The Republic by the phrase that " literature may be either true or false ", i.e.

true stories and fictions, Plato objects to the fictions as false. So, Plato’s epistemology led him astray in evaluating art and justifying censorship.

Pornography and Censorship

He saw the operation of the state as necessary for the life of the citizens. Its protections and the productivity from the division of labor were necessary for life.

Plato censorship
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Plato on censoring artists — a summary – Stephen Hicks, Ph.D.